Antoninianus of Gallienus

Richard Lyon is the detectorist who unearthed this Roman coin. It’s an antoninianus of Gallienus, whose dates are AD 253 to 268.

So many coins were struck for Gallienus that most are fairly common today. This one though, is quite scarce. On the obverse, facing left, is the radiate head of the emperor, who has a shield covering one shoulder and a spear resting on the other shoulder. The legend on this side reads GALLIENVS P F AVG.

On the reverse is the figure of Victory, who faces to the right and holds a wreath and a palm. Victory is on a globe, either side of which is a seated German captive. The legend on this side reads VICT GERMANICA.

In volume III of David Sear’s Roman Coins and Their Values this type is listed as number 10379. In Roman Imperial Coins it is number 49. It was struck at Cologne during AD 257-60. A number of other coins of the same denomination are very similar to this one.

If a collector wanted to buy a decent antoninianus of Gallienus then they could get one for a price not far into double figures. This specimen would grade about VF and is scarce, so my price range would be £30-35.

Valuation

If a collector wanted to buy a decent antoninianus of Gallienus then they could get one for a price not far into double figures. This specimen would grade about VF and is scarce, so my price range would be £30 – £35.

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